Exterior

BALANCING ACT // NOVEMBER 2018
KENNEBUNKPORT CLASSIC // OCTOBER 2018
QUIET CONTEMPORARY // DECEMBER 2018
IRON FIST, VELVET GLOVE // DECEMBER 2018
HIDDEN TREASURES // SEPTEMBER 2018
MASTER OF BLUE // FEBRUARY 2018
FIT FOR FAMILY // JUNE 2017
NESTING ON THE NECK // AUGUST 2018

“We have so many wonderful old camps in our area, and a lot of these places go unnoticed—as if they’re hiding in plain sight. I think it’s important to maintain that idea with new construction and exterior remodeling. Rangeley is so beautiful; homes here should be as beautiful without overpowering their natural surroundings. I’m also a big believer in symmetry. Even if it’s impossible to achieve, I like to do things that trick the eye into thinking there’s a symmetrical balance to the exterior of a house.”—Jill Crosby, designer, Rangeley Building & Remodeling

BALANCING ACT // NOVEMBER 2018
Designed and built by Knickerbocker Group, this contemporary house
sits on a hill above the waters of midcoast Maine. Built with several
levels to conform to the land’s elevation changes, it features a series
of horizontal lines that rise like a staircase behind the trees, and a mix
of exterior siding materials that echo the colors in the landscape.
ARCHITECT & BUILDER: Knickerbocker Group
LANDSCAPE DESIGNER: Davis Landscape Company
PHOTOGRAPHY: François Gagné

KENNEBUNKPORT CLASSIC // OCTOBER 2018
By tearing down an existing ranch and building new, architect Brian
Beaudette was able to site this classic, shingle-style home higher on the
property. It now offers glimpses of the ocean around every turn, and combines
a bright, open layout with plenty of privacy for the family and their guests.
ARCHITECT: Brian Beaudette Architect
BUILDER: Richard Moody & Sons Construction
LANDSCAPE DESIGN & INSTALLATION: CL Design & Landscape
PHOTOGRAPHY: Jeff Roberts

QUIET CONTEMPORARY // DECEMBER 2018
Situated between two dark fiber-cement wings of this Falmouth home, the
entry’s glass and shiplap cedar walls present a bright, welcoming contrast.
Trapezoidal windows under the shed roof provide further interest.
ARCHITECT: Kevin Browne Architecture
BUILDER: Sylvain & Sevigny Custom Builders
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT: Soren deNiord Design Studio
PHOTOGRAPHY: Jonathan Reece

IRON FIST, VELVET GLOVE // DECEMBER 2018
Inspired by homes on the Outer Banks of North Carolina, architect Caleb
Johnson placed his client’s new Moody Beach cottage on round wooden
piers sunk into concrete five feet below grade. He broke up the home’s mass
into two volumes: offices for the owner and her husband are contained in the
smaller volume, while living and sleeping spaces are in the larger—both offer
sweeping views.
ARCHITECT: Caleb Johnson Studio
BUILDER: Chase Construction
LANDSCAPE DESIGNER: Richardson & Associates
PHOTOGRAPHY: Trent Bell

HIDDEN TREASURES // SEPTEMBER 2018
This eco-friendly home in North Yarmouth was intended to blend
seamlessly into the native trees. “Our whole approach was to minimize
the disruption to the existing landscape,” says architect Harry Hepburn
of Briburn. “Our focus was on using natural materials and earth
tones to give the house a strong connection to the outdoors.”
ARCHITECT: Briburn
BUILDER: Taggart Construction
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT: Soren deNiord Design Studio
PHOTOGRAPHY: Irvin Serrano

MASTER OF BLUE // FEBRUARY 2018
Builder Jonathan Trudo renovated an existing Kennebunkport beach
house into a light-filled, open-plan home. While the design looks complex,
architectural designer Erik Peterson says the multiple gables, all facing in
different directions, are “responding to the spaces below.”
ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER: Peterson Design Group
BUILDER: Creative Coast Construction
LANDSCAPE DESIGN & INSTALLATION: Boiling Spring Landscape
PHOTOGRAPHY: Jeff Roberts

FIT FOR FAMILY // JUNE 2017
To accommodate extended family on a limited piece of land in Old Orchard
Beach, architect John D. Morris II designed a home with four “boxes” lined up
next to each other. Eye-catching details that Morris refers to as “jewelry,” such
as the arched copper-clad roof over the living room, make the house shine.
ARCHITECT: John Morris Architects
BUILDER: Rideout & Turner
LANDSCAPING: Bourne Landscape
PHOTOGRAPHY: Jeff Roberts

NESTING ON THE NECK // AUGUST 2018
Although this new home on Prouts Neck is three stories, it looks smaller than
it is. Rather than having any large exterior walls, architects Christina Carlson
and Donald Powers set the roofline low. “It’s tall, but it springs from the
first-story eaves,” Carlson explains. The black-painted window and door trim
stands out against the soft beige wood siding. “Throughout the house there is
a deliberate balance between traditional elements and contemporary ones,”
says builder Josh Morrison.
ARCHITECT: Union Studio Architecture & Community Design
BUILDER: R.P. Morrison Builders
STONE WORK: Stoneyard
PHOTOGRAPHY: Jeff Roberts